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Poetry of Romantics

 

The Smile

There is a Smile of Love

And there is a Smile of Deceit

And there is a Smile of Smiles

In which these two Smiles meet

 - An Extract of the Poem The Smile, By William Blake

Poetry-of-the-Romantics

These were the lines in the first page of the book that attracted my attention. I was surfing my book shelf when I found this beautiful book that I even forgot that I had. I suddenly remembered that my brother brought it in one of his vacations  and I used a poem from the collection to impress a lady at that time. Other than that I did not remember anything else about it. I decided to give a look at this book.Romantic Poetry was a kind of statement at one time, rejecting the formality of style and subject of Augustan Poets, the Romantics gave voice to sentiments, desires and unconscious feelings. Poets like Wordsworth, Keats and Shelley were trying to create a new style of poetry and were very active in the Romantic revolution.

I always hated literature as a subject when I was student and mostly bunked the classes, so it was a new experience for me reading these poems. And I would say that I definitely liked it. A must have in one’s collection if you are a poetry lover. A good companion in solitude… There are about 110 poems in the compilation. The poets who feature in it are William Blake, Robert Burns, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, JL Hunt, William Wordsworth, Robert Southney, Lord Byron, PB Shelley, Anon, John Keats, Walter Savage Landor, John Clare, and George Darley. The collection has wide variety of themes like human spirit, time, love, art and beauty. My personal favorites are To a Butterfly By Wordsworth, To a Skylark by Shelley and Infant Sorrow by William Blake. If you however ask who my favorite poet is, I would say John Clare.  So, I would end with one of his verse.

 I Am

I am: yet what I am none cares or knows,

My friends forsake me like a memory lost;

I am the self-consumer of my woes -

They rise and vanish in oblivion’s host,

Like shadows in love-frenzied stifled throes;

And yet I am, and live – like vapours tost.

-  An Extract of “I am” by John Clare

Compiled by Paul Driver

Publish date: 1995

Publisher: Penguine books

Paperback, 112 pages

ISBN 0140622020    (ISBN: 13: 9780140622027)

Book review written by Pramathesh Borkotoky

0 04 April, 2010 Books April 4, 2010

About the author

An avid tea drinker, Pramathesh believes that the key strategy to survive in this world is to have great faith in the good, and GC provides the platform for that.

View all articles by Pramathesh Borkotoky

13 comments

  1. Mani

    Welcome on board! Dont worry ! will have all my revenge of fried eye on you , here in ginger chai. :sarcasm:

    1. Pramathesh B

      It was my favorite too. My English Teacher told that they should be our favorite. Although not directly, but it indirectly meant that. :P

      Now, I enjoy reading peotry. No reason.

      1. Lakshmi Rajan

        Even before marriage I lost interested in poetry :-) and about reading bills and bankstatement :evilgrin: it’s my better half’s domain and I am poor in it :-P

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